Monthly Archives: February 2013

Call for speakers: EPIC

If your professional practice takes in ethnography in any of its forms, from design research to big data to business innovation, take a look at this call for speakers. There are lots of ways to get involved, from full length talks, to putting forward artifacts for discussion, to short Pecha Kucha talks.

EPIC is an international conference on the current and future practice of ethnography in the business world, and it’s coming to London’s Royal Institution on the 16-18 of September, 2013.

Since its inception, the EPIC conference has brought together a dynamic community of practitioners, scholars and entrepreneurs concerned with how ethnographic thinking and methods for understanding human behavior in the contemporary world are used to transform the worlds of business, innovation, service design, the public sector and beyond.  By understanding people, what they do, how they do it and how these change over time, we can create better business strategies, processes and products, as well as enhance and simplify people’s lives.

Call for submissions – Deadline: March 9th, 2013
We are seeking engagement with social design firms, public policy developers, think tanks, the variety of marketing sciences, business schools, the design sector; in fact anyone using ethnographic research to inform design, business, or innovation. This may take the form of various theories made relevant and useful today, present discussions on technology such as how businesses, cities and communities are using ethnographic ways of knowing to find balance in a time of transition, including:

  • How ethnographers are pushing the boundaries of theory from the social sciences and humanities (i.e., rituals, symbolic interpretation, gift-exchange, kinship, participation, access and agency, etc.);
  • The phenomenon of Big Data and the use of technology to support ethnographic data collection, organization and analysis
  • How ethnographic research and social science thinking inform sectors in transition, such as finance, education and energy

If you are thinking to yourself, ‘I could attend but I couldn’t possibly present’, think again. There are many ways to get involved, we encourage submissions for Papers, Artifacts and Pecha Kucha sessions. You can read the full Call on the EPIC 2013 conference website: http://epiconference.com/2013/program
Questions? Email us at info@epicconference.com

Call for Speakers: Cleanweb

Chris from Cleanweb got in touch, they run a monthly meet up with short talks where people share ideas and experiences around the web and sustainability. They’re really keen to encourage new speakers and working towards a more diverse roster of speakers, either for 15-20 min talks, or 5 minute lightning talks.

Every month, we run a meetup, usually presenting a series of talks at a given venue in London, with a capacity of between 50 and 100 people.

Generally the talks tend to cover the intersection between cloud computing and cleantech, and applying the ideas inherent to the web in aid of sustainability.

These might cover websites to help people network around local food, building energy monitoring systems with internet facing APIs, making the web itself greener, or developing online tools for sustainability.

Inspired somewhat by the O’reilly conference diversity page, we’re actively seeking to increase the diversity of our attendees, speakers, and sponsors through our calls for proposals, and through dialogue with the larger communities our members make up.

That said, we’d appreciate your help in this process, and here are a few ways you can do so:

  • recommend speakers or potential organisers
  • forward our requests for speakers to relevant communities, letting them know we’re after more diverse speaker lineup
  • get in touch to suggest with any other ideas to help make for more diverse meetups

If you’re umming and ahing about volunteering for a talk, or thinking of doing one but don’t feel ready to give a talk yet, please don’t hesitate to get in touch – we’re happy to give pointers on content, or any advice to help get you the point where you can share something you’re interested with a friendly community in a safe atmosphere.

Find out more here

Call for Speakers: Ruby Manor

Ruby Manor have been in touch – they have an open, anonymous submissions process and are really keen to have more submissions from women and other under-represented groups.

Ruby Manor is a one-day, community-driven event based in London, which aims to strengthen the community of Ruby Developers via a generous handful of interesting presentations and lots of informal getting-to-know-each-other. We’re looking for talks that are principally about interesting aspects or uses of the Ruby programming language, or generally anything that might be of interest to an audience of mostly-Ruby but principally-curious developers.

We use a simple tool called Vestibule (http://vestibule.rubymanor.org) to submit proposals, and strongly encourage the community to help presenters refine and explore their proposals. This way, everyone has the opportunity to really influence the content of the day, and we find that it really helps presenters ensure that their material is as relevant and engaging as possible. Proposals can be as long or as short as you like – if there are aspects that may benefit from clarification, the suggestions process should help us drive that out together. Proposals are also anonymous, and will be selected purely based on interest from the community.

Once the successful proposals have been selected by the community, we’ll also help to develop and polish the presentations, via rehearsals where possible and other mechanisms where otherwise necessary. Presentations will be a maximum of 30 minutes + 10 minutes for questions, although if you have something interesting you’d like to talk about which takes less time, then that’s OK too. We’ll build the schedule around the best proposals, rather than forcing everyone into an equal-sized slot.